On Writing: The Importance of Critique Partners

Bad Girlz Write: Part Two

writing with critique partnersWeek before last (May 15), the talented ladies over at the Bad Girlz Write blog hosted a J to tha M chat about critique partners. You can read the final version here, but, as you may have noticed, we can be wordy bitches–or, at least, M can. We had so much fun with the subject and subsequent chat, we decided to share all the crap we cut on the FFYW blog. Lucky you guys, right?

Outtakes and Deleted Scenes

J: Jesus. how long has it been?

sometimes it doesn’t feel like long at all

and sometimes I feel like I’ve known you forever

when was that contest I asked you to judge?

M: Early 2010?

J: I read one of your stories and stalked you

I mean, asked you to judge a contest

I don’t even remember the contest

but I do remember getting all heart-clenchy when I read your stuff and wishing I could do that

make people get all heart-clenchy, I mean

and when I put that call out on twitter for a WC and you popped up, I kind of fangirled. a little. I mean, a tiny bit

M: I love to hear heart-clenchy

and, man, that was a long time ago

J: we’ve been pretty together on a lot of things

M: except that fluffcloud thing

J: you love my fluffcloud

M: the whole licorice and cotton candy

J: I keep you smiling through your gross licorice

you also love knocking me off of my cotton candy fluffcloud on occasion

I oblige you

that’s what friends do

M: keep it balanced

J: How did we get to the point where we wouldn’t write anything without the other seeing it?

M: I think it was during the WC chats where we both were kind of eyeing each other

J: and we gradually moved to private chats

from pasting bits and pieces to sending the whole chapter

we were sponges, ready to grab whatever we could from each other

soak up

M: and we were not only open to learning, but wanted it desperately

J: I loved that you were willing to make changes

instead of thinking you had it down because you had so many readers

and also that you were willing to give me a shot in spite of the few readers I had

M: honestly, I didn’t write to get readers. I wrote to get it out of my head and share. Part of that has always been wanting to make it better

J: that was so easy for me to see, too

M: make it better to satisfy myself and hopefully anyone who happens to read it along with it

J: we did go through a pretty short “getting to know you” period

if someone were to ask me why I trust you so much–well, we’ve covered a lot of it. Definitely your willingness to keep learning. I know if you don’t know, you’ll look it up. I never worry that you’ll tell me something without knowing for sure

then there’s your ability, which I saw firsthand. I already respected your writing before we met

M: it’s the being able to admit and understand that we might be wrong and willing to learn if we are or not

honestly, attitude is the most important thing

J: it’s hard to have a partnership when one believes she/he is better than the other

M: and it’s being able to question, too

not take everything the other says for granted

being able to argue a point

being able to accept when we’re wrong – and when we’re right

and know there are no hard feelings, that we can have a healthy debate

be honest but kind, not hurt each other’s feelings

J: some of your “no effing way” choices make me giggle sometimes, too

You with cooing. Me with flesh.

I just made myself shudder with that one

M: only babies and old ladies coo

not hunky heroes

just no

J: I never had a hunky hero coo

for the record

M: thank baby jesus

J: who would definitely coo

M: Only as as a baby

J: We just kind of fell in each other’s laps (or not. still working on that one.)

M: you’re going to be working a long time

J: I’m determined. Another thing you love about me

M: As far as finding a good CP, get to know people, who you fit with

J: it really is hit or miss. it’s just a matter of sticking it out

M: like meeting friends

J: and actually don’t be quick to trust

M: some people you like and click with, some you don’t

J: however our story might contradict that

M: everyone has different strength and weaknesses, and it’s great when you find someone who complements, balances

but the most important thing is comfort and attitude, I think

J: I can’t even begin to say how grateful I am for your patience when I’m going through your stuff

when I feel like someone’s tapping their watch, I make mistakes. I miss things.

M: yes, it’s a lot of understanding and being considerate on all kinds of levels, while being honest, too

honest about the editing issues, as well as time, and knowledge

when you have that level of trust, you both feel comfortable in asking and doing

M: writing is a lot of stress

and emotion

J: I just realized (again) how special you are

M: we have a pretty special relationship

J: what’s really telling of the comfort and trust in our partnership is our decision to write a whole book together

and then, because we’re either geniuses or fucking idiots, a whole series

M: and those two things together can be a fuck-all mess

J: I usually sway toward geniuses

M: oh, absolutely 🙂

J: I also think it’s going to be obvious to anyone reading this chat that I’m definitely the cotton candy

heh

M: good critique partners are all about support – all different kinds

I’m the whippy licorice, for sure.

J: but man, I love you

M: aw, I love you, too

we need that balance

otherwise, we’d be flaily messes

J: and I can’t thank you enough every day for the support you’ve given and still give. The knowledge, the patience, the learning, the understanding, the firm line in the sand once in a while…

M: it goes both ways, it really does.

I couldn’t do this without you

J: and I feel the same

M: if you weren’t there to talk me down from my ledge…

J: it’s also important to mention that we weren’t the only person there for each other. What lonely lives that would be

we’ve always been smart enough to know someone outside needs to see it first, too

M: absolutely

J: I had Tiff; you had Sarah

and sometimes even more eyes beyond that

M: oh, yes

M: no manuscript is ever perfect. someone will always find something

fresh eyes

that understanding there makes us even stronger

J: and you and I have never had a problem with sharing

M: if we did, we wouldn’t have the relationship we do

J: because we’re lucky bitches.

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J to tha M Review The Elemental Mysteries Series

Four Book Reviews in One!

elemental mysteriesSince our scheduled reviewer was unable to make the deadline, we decided to post a J to tha M chat about a series we both read and really enjoyed. Hope you do, too!

M: So, that rec you gave me last week.

The Elemental Mysteries series by Elizabeth Hunter

That Kindle is doing the job and making you read more – yay!

J: Heh, yes. Did you like?

M: I really did. Ate them up.

J:  the most impressive thing about these books is that they’re self-published

I know she works with an editor or several

M: I think the most impressive thing is the world building, to be honest

Vampire clans coming from each of the four elements and being able to manipulate them

the self-publish adds to the interesting, though

her books are a great example of self-pub done right

elemental mysteriesJ:  I really think so, too. What was amazing was that I didn’t THINK I was super attached to the characters in the first one – A Hidden Fire – but I still couldn’t wait to read the next one – This Same Earth. So apparently I was connected. And then The Force of Wind, and A Fall of Water.

M:  yes, exactly. I felt there were some minor issues with the first one – pacing, some editing, small stuff like that – but I was so happy to find she fixed those little irritations in the subsequent books

I think in fixing those issues, it allowed me to make that strong connection I wanted but just didn’t quite get in the first one

J:  Another surprising thing was how much I actually rooted for the heroine. I mean, she managed to get herself kidnapped every time she turned around, but she wasn’t whiny or weak

M:  yes, she did a great job on that balance

making the heroine strong and self-sufficient while still having human weakness in a vampire world

and then toward the end – yeehaw. B was an awesome badass

J:  Oh, and real vampire fights. Hallelujah! I don’t usually seek out vampire books, and it actually surprised me when this one was

but I was excited to see real action

not lots of worry for nothing

elemental mysteriesM: and well-written real action

J: ohhhhh

and the love scenes

the way the vampires mated and drew strength

M: mm, yes

it’s similar to BDB in that they get strength in feeding from their mates

which is a huge sexy trigger, I think

and she managed to do it very well and very uniquely in the world and mythology she built

J:  hmmm. I still haven’t read that

it’s kind of funny to see the different vampire mythologies

how they cross and mirror and then take off in another direction

elemental mysteriesM:  lots of fun things to work with when writing about vampires

but speaking of all the sexy triggers…

Giovanni

J:  oh hey

the name is enough

M:  I mean, she hit just about all those triggers and made him believable and not over the top

Gorgeous Italian renaissance man. Ruthless and unbeatable fighter. Deadly killer. Protective, faithful, loving.

and a fire vampire

I mean, come on. That was awesome.

A vampire who can control fire

J:  without killing himself

also important

so he’s specialer

M:  just the mental image she painted of him walking toward his enemies with blue flames licking all over his upper body, ready to blast them out of existence

Yep. Sexy.

elemental worldJ:  and then there’s Carwyn

adorable

and set up beautifully for his own book – Building from Ashes

M:  yes

and I love how the characters are not all purely good or purely bad (except Lorenzo – he’s a great villain)

she manages that balance very well, too

shows the real flaws like we all have and makes you cheer for them

J:  he seemed a little….dimwitted for a villain at times

but then that was a great device, too

because dumb people are often more dangerous than the smart ones

M:  I didn’t exactly see it as dimwitted, more like he let his personal vengeance get in the way of world domination

that was his flaw

I went through all four Gio and Beatrice books this past week, and am halfway through Carwyn’s story

J: Yay! Glad you liked.

M: Oh, yes. I really did. So glad I continued on to the second. I feel it’s much stronger, as is the rest of the series. Isn’t A Hidden Fire still free on Amazon right now? I need to go buy the next in the spin-off series.

brb

Book Review Elemental Mysteries

About the Author

Elizabeth Hunter is a contemporary fantasy and romance author. She is a graduate of the University of Houston Honors College in the Department of English (Linguistics) and a former English teacher.

She currently lives in Central California with a seven-year-old ninja who claims to be her child. She enjoys reading, writing, travel, and bowling (despite the fact that she’s not very good at it.) Someday, she plans to learn how to scuba dive. And maybe hang glide. But that looks like a lot of running.

She is the author of the Elemental Mysteries and Elemental World series, the Cambio Springs series, and other works of fiction.

J to tha M: The New Adult Revolution

J and M Plot a New Adult Novel

New Adult genre

© Djma | Dreamstime Stock Photos & Stock Free Images

J: After reading Jeanette Grey, Nichole Chase, and Jennifer Iacopelli, i’m liking the new adult genre

I think I’m going to angle the new book as new adult

M: I’ve read a couple that have been good. Jeanette’s Take What You Want for sure.

but I really enjoy good UST, and a lot of the YA, NA, whatever/A seem to replace the sexual tension with just holy-crap-over-dramatic angst.

J: yeah

they’re all wounded boy/abused girl

hate hate hate then screw

so I pounce when I find one that isn’t, even if it’s too sweet

M: yeah, there’s been a couple I considered checking out that people have raved about, but angst for the sake of angst, just to pull a response from the reader, tends to irritate me

I’m scared I’ll just be annoyed

J: yeah

if it says anything about a dark secret or whatever, I avoid

M: usually just annoys me instead of tugging at my emotions

J: or a hidden past

M: ugh

J: or worse, a dark past

M: the boy is wooooounded

the girl was raped. Ya know, that’s not the only background “reason” for angst, and it’s so overused anymore, which causes its own problems. But that’s a discussion for another day.

J: HIDDEN SECRETS AND DARK PASTS!

alcoholic father

M: all excuses to be a dick

J: exactly

I don’t want to write that

“I’m no good for you. I’m going to kiss/fuck you and then run away forever!”

M: I read one that’s a new adult. It’s selling like crazy on Amazon

Broken Beyond Redemption or Damaged Past Caring or something like that. Probably not that exactly, but you know what I mean.

J: oh no

M: and oi

J: not with a title like that

DARK SECRETS, M

M: it was just stupid

stupid stupid.

PEOPLE DON’T ACT LIKE THAT!

EVER!

J: hahaha

I’m starting to think we should plot out a New Adult book

seriously

and throw in the craziest things we can think of

M: every damaged Alphahole with mommy issues who turns to BDSM and the girl who was raped by her cousin’s brother’s best friends lover saves him with her pure and innocent love

add in slutty best friend with drug problems

who secretly is in love with Alphahole and wants him for herself

J: who likes to dress her up like a barbie doll

oh, yours is better

the guy’s best friend gets a little fresh a little too often with her

and tortured hero beats the crap out of him at a party one night

and she’s all “you kicked your best friend’s ass over me? It must be love!”

and he’s all “whoa, whoa, let’s not use that word.”

M: oh, yes. He has to beat the crap out of everyone. That’s love, not anger issues and violent tendencies

J: and she’s all “I’ll love you if I want to. I just won’t say it. Instead, I’ll mope around for six months while you spiral into a deep depression and take to cutting yourself.”

M: and Tattoos

he has to have Tattoos

capital “T”

J: of course he does

big scary ones

M: because he’s wooooounded

poor little Alphahole

J: but they have to be hidden by a long-sleeve shirt for his day job at a call center

but they’re just fine for his night job as a bar back at the hottest club in town

I mean, his dad gambled away all their money, so he has to pay his way through college somehow

sorry, his dad drank all their money. DARK PAST!

M: yes, he works at a call center saving kittens and rainbows

J: but no one can know about it

M: between beating the crap out of people because he lurves her

J: except the sweet, batty old lady that manages the employees

(comic relief)

M: oh, yes. And, we forgot about the fiery attraction

dueling for dominance tongues

and not knowing where she ends and he begins

J: we can add that in around the dickishness

where it makes the least sense, of course

like after he’s beaten the shit out of someone

M: and flashed his tattoos

J: Tattoos. Capital “T” remember

M: OH!

and he’s in a band

*nods*

J: of course he is

he plays bass

no

bass players are too laid back

he’s definitely the broody lead singer

M: No, moody, sexy lead singer

haha – you just said that

J: sometimes we scare me

I’m gonna go mull our new hero

brb

Calling All Readers, Writers, Editors, Publishers

Basically Everyone

call for book bloggers

freedigitalphotos.net imagerymajestic

It’s been three months since the commencement of Fight for Your Write, and we’re shocked, awed, and so very pleased at the success so far. We’ve heard from true-blue marketing professionals, received fiery opinion pieces from readers, learned about writing from some amazing authors, and shared some giggles and laughs along the way, too. We only hope you’ve had as much fun as we have.

We started this thing with a bang and feel that’s the only way to continue. Without you, that’s impossible. Not just as readers, either. We’re so glad you love reading. Faithful visitors are the reason the blog has been successful so far. But we want to hear you, too. Everyone has a voice, an opinion, a lesson. Take a step, a leap of faith and share your words with us.

Some pretty incredible guests are in the queue, but there’s plenty of room for more. If you’ve been sitting on the sidelines, wishing you could say something, now’s your chance. Hit us up by clicking on one of the categories under So What’cha Want there on the side. You can volunteer to review a book, offer your book for review, submit a guest blog about your writing process, give marketing and publicity tips, or just unload your gripe about today’s books. We love it all.

What are you waiting for? Check the rules under I Run This Land, You Understand and send us your thoughts. We’re already obsessively checking our inbox.

J and M

J to tha M: What We’re Writing

J Writes Erotica?!

tips for writing erotica

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J:  I had this big epiphany for a new book, but I’m not entirely sure how to make it work.

A reluctant hit woman.

M: It’s hard to make those sympathetic. Or would it be satire?

J: I’m not smart enough for satire

it would just be silly chick lit

and of course, she falls in love with the mark

which means he has to be sympathetic

but the real question is…

should I adopt a pen name and make this series erotica?

M:  Well…here’s the thing. You have to write sex pretty well to do that – to write a sexy, intriguing, hot erotic novel or novella. A *good* sexy, intriguing, hot erotic

J:  I could probably do that

maybe

and with you around to whip me into shape…

M:  I’d consider maybe amping up your sex scenes first

I mean, I’m not 100% sure about writing straight out erotica myself

I would need to be sure I at least thought I could give it a fair shot

J:  you mean I should write at least one before I dub myself an erotica author?

M:  I’m still working my skills, thought process, and writing to that point

by all means, give it a shot if it’s in your head and that’s where your characters want to take you

but…

good, not eye-rolly, squicky, or throw-the-book-across-the-room erotica takes a certain mindset and experience writing sex scenes, I think

J:  you’ve got a point. I’m still working on writing good, not eye-rolly, squicky, or throw the book across the room regular scenes

M:  yeah. You have to be comfortable writing those first, I’d say

but who knows – maybe you’ve got a hidden erotica alter ego. Jen Bare-y. Haha.

on the other hand…

J:  which other hand?

there are lots of them.

M:  erotic sex scenes are hard to write. good ones, that is

I seem to remember a story you wrote a chapter of under an alter ego for fun

wasn’t that a foray into more erotic territory?

J:  Oh, I didn’t shy away from writing sex in the past

that was before I realized I sucked at it

M:  Um. You can’t suck at writing sex in erotica

J:  Oh, for a moment, I thought you meant that I can’t suck. As in, I’m incapable of sucking

then I realized what you meant

you weren’t exactly saying I don’t suck, which is fair enough

i’m giggling

and getting funny looks

M:  well, you don’t suck

J:  why, thank you

you keep me in line

M: Howevah, sex scenes are not your strong point. And I think it only makes sense a writer needs to be able to write really strong sex scenes for good erotica, yes?

so I would just put that out there to consider before diving into a full erotic novel

M:  but write the story and characters and see where they take you. That’s the most important thing

J:  fair enough

you do know I’m not actually going to write erotica, right?

I leave all the sex-writing to you

and if you’re not there to do it, I write YA

*nods*

But it is sexy when you lecture me.

M:  yeah. I’m like “Jen? Erotica? Um…How do I put this? I need a drink. A big drink.”

hahaha

Oooh, and I have chocolate vodka

brb

J: …wait. What are you trying to say?

J: Hello?

J to tha M: What We’re Reading

Series, Serials, and Cliffhangers

series, serial novels, and cliffhangers

Dudley Do-Right, created by Alex Anderson

J: so, I’m currently about 50% through the fourth book in Elizabeth Hunter’s series

Elemental Mysteries

and our stalking paid off

she has agreed to a guest post

M: You read three books in a week? Woo-hoo! They must be good

J: um, yes

they’re really addictive

I know I need to read up on The Painting of Porcupine City so our interview with Ben Monopoli doesn’t spoil it for me

so that’s next. I promise

M: That’s one of the things that makes series so fun. If you like them, you can pick up the next.

fun for both the reader and writer to stay in an intriguing world

J: yeah, but I’m not a fan of the cliffhanger thing. There are a few reasons for a cliffhanger, and none are good

the first is that you’re too wordy to fit everything in one book, so you split at a vital point

the second is that you aren’t sure if you created a compelling enough story to keep readers coming back for more

so you have to trick them

M: Some cliffhangers are good, to build suspense, keep the reader wanting to turn the page. I love a good cliffhanger when used like that.

What I’ve found annoying is those books that are written to end on a huge “cliffhanger” for the sole purpose of getting you to buy the next. You get 130 pages for 2.99 and the story just ends in the middle of the scene, so you have to pay another 2.99 for the next 130 pages if you want to read the rest of the story.

And then you find out there are like four “books” in the series like that

to me, those aren’t really cliffhangers. Those are just ending in the middle of a scene.

J: there is that, too

M: There are the serial novels, which is a much better alternative

I mentioned a couple I’m reading a week or so ago

Where you pay one price and get installments automatically delivered to your Kindle

J: I could get behind something like that. Would be like a TV show

M: but you know in advance the (reasonable) full price and when you’ll get the next episode

J: yeah, instead of getting to the end and finding out you have to fork over more money

M: exactly. You can make a fully informed choice from the beginning

J: i love a good series, though. I love an epic story that requires more than one book to tell

M: I wonder if the new interest in the serialized novels is a reflection of the proven popularity of fanfiction. They do follow a similar format

J: I thought that, too

are they all dramatic and soap opera-y?

do you hear “dun dun dun!” in your head when you finish an installment?

M: some are, just like any book

J: She turned to see who was at the door and gasped.

tune in next time!

M: it’s like the ending of a chapter, though. They’re ended that way to keep you turning the page

whether it’s a serial or a traditional book

J: well, I can get behind it because you know what you’re getting when you go in

M:  In that format, a cliffhanger is, I don’t know, more accepted. Expected.

When one just ends only to sucker you into buying the next…I’m not 100% sure how I feel about that, but mostly no likey

J: accepted because you know the rest is coming

I really no likey

and usually enough to abandon ship

M: Yeah. I read one like that recently. Thank goodness the first one was free – which is a whole ‘nother subject, I think. And the story was fairly good, but then, it just ended in the middle of an action scene, and the next book was 2 or 3.99. And the next, and the next.

J: >.<

M: And even though I did like the story and would have liked to read more and see what happened – oh, hell no.

J: I feel you

M: I was annoyed

as both a reader and a writer

J: and I bet a lot of people agree with us

except, of course, the authors who exploit their readers in this way

M: and then there are those novellas – which are really popular right now – that just…end

J: oh, I’m a fan of the novella. bite-size fun

M: I like them, too. I mean, I understand the shortened nature of them and how difficult it can be to get in enough character and story development, but it’s just frustrating, to enjoy a story and characters so much, for the author to have done such a good job with the rest of the story, and then…

wah, wah, wah wahhhhhhh

J: but if you have to end without an ending, you probably should have made it a full novel

M: or, you know, come up with a better ending

J: oh, yeah

or that

what I think is a fun idea are the novellas centered on side characters in a series

M: Oh, I like those, too. It’s like a special surprise bonus to revisit a world you loved and characters you want to know more about. I think it’s cool that ebooks seemed to have opened that up as an option. made it more viable.

Oh, hang on. I need to see who’s at the door

brb

**gasp**

Tune in next week!

J to tha M on Reviews, Marketing, and Cheese

What We’re Reading…or Not Reading

book reviews and author marketing

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J: I read a book! Well, I read a couple, but my recent history suggests this is a rare thing. Of course, there was Ben Monopoli’s The Cranberry Hush. Loved. I think I might have a reader-crush on him.

M: I thought you’d like that one. Vince is very Holden-esque

J: Holden, yes. Vince, yes. But mostly the authors who created them. Also, our stalking has paid off once more. Interview with Mr. Monopoli coming soon! (We should maybe clarify that our stalking is in no way shady and almost always welcomed by the authors in question…)

M: Read his books and prepare to ask questions. There may be spoilers in the interview, but we’ll be sure to warn everyone.

J: I have The Painting of Porcupine City queued and ready to go soon. I’m also reading Elizabeth Hunter’s A Hidden Fire.

I’m only half done, but I do not hate

not even a little bit

in fact, I think I’ll love and have to order the next three immediately

M:  I love that

finding something you like and being able to read more

J:  I think you would like this one

but I’ll wait to rec until I finish

M:  I’m not a huge YA fan

they have to be pretty good

J:  it’s a vampire one

but I did not know that when I started. It doesn’t necessarily read like a YA, either.

M:  I read the beginning of an erotica BDSM trilogy by Lila Dubois. The first book was free – Undone Rebel – not sure if it still is. It was good. Not annoying, sexy

but I like a well-written, sexy story

J: it looks kind of cute, actually

M: it was

I liked both hero and heroine

cute, sexy, and free

J: one of the reviews says geek-turned-dom

tell me it’s the hero

please

M: it is

computer geek 😉

J: *dances*

i have such a soft spot for the geeks

M: geek dom

and fun

J: siiiiigh

M: I was very pleasantly surprised.

J:  I’ve got it but haven’t started it

but I will

M:  it’s definitely BDSM-y

good, though

Started a romantic suspense – jury is still out. Started pretty well, but then…

got kinda draggy and now looks like it will succumb to the Silly Romance Overreaction and Misunderstanding

I need to catch up on my reviews

which makes a good segue

I’ve gotten a few emails from authors patrolling reviews of books similar to theirs on Amazon

Sending the emails to the reviewers and asking them to read and review their book. This last one actually sent the book as a pdf attachment.

J:  I actually got a review request to my email, too

I didn’t connect the two until you said something

M:  I find this annoying.

I mean, I understand coming up with new and creative ways to get your book put there. All authors struggle with marketing.

But I’m pretty uncomfortable with people picking up my contact info from Amazon and

using it like that

And it likely violates a number of Amazon policies, not that that means much anymore

Something like that would never occur to me.

Maybe that’s why I suck at marketing myself

But I could never do anything like that, something that I find so annoying and, well, just uncomfortable

J: liam and I had a discussion about marketing the other night

I want to try a few new things in the future

M: I’d love to hear. Honestly, the only thing I’ve found that really helps is write a better book

“better” in terms of something that really connects with readers

J: we had visual aids and stuff

M: haha – omg

would have loved to see that

J: it was actually pretty funny

over dinner

a container of romano cheese

there may have been a mess to clean up

“this container of cheese represents my sphere of influence. I have reached them all. This piece of lonely cheese out here represents someone who would love my book but has no idea it exists. how do I reach that piece of cheese?”

“well, all of this cheese–” he dumps a handful on the table “–has to go tell that cheese.”

“but they don’t know that cheese. no one I know knows that cheese.”

M: mmm, cheese

word of mouth is so powerful. that’s the best way to reach people

figuring out how to get them to talk is the thing

J: that was another point. “this cheese may EVENTUALLY reach that cheese, but do we want to wait that long? how do I go directly to THAT cheese?”

J: I guess the most important thing is for people to just keep spreading the word if they find a book they like. Goodreads helps, but not everyone is on Goodreads. Same with Facebook and Twitter. You think?

M: I do. That’s why I love talking about books I enjoyed. I want other people to have a chance to enjoy, too, and help spread the word for the author.

J: So, who do we stalk this week for the blog? Whose amazing skills do we want to learn about next? Suggestions? Maybe Elizabeth Hunter?

M: Sounds good. I’m off to spread the stalk–I mean love.

brb