Book Review: Tethers by Jack Croxall

Guest Review by Lisa Lester

Tethers by jack croxall ReviewSet in Victorian-era England, Jack Croxall’s Tethers (The Tethers Trilogy #1) introduces us to Karl Scheffer and Esther Emerson, two teenagers growing up in the sleepy rural town of Shraye.  (From the descriptions, I imagine it’d be something like growing up in Tolkien’s the Shire.  Only, with less hobbits.)  Like teenagers the world over, they long to escape the confines of their small town lives and small town destines; Karl is being groomed to enter the teaching profession, while Esther is expected to continue on in the family business.  Everything changes, however, when Karl discovers a notebook with curious diary entries, the last of which mentions he and Esther by name.  Determined to find answers, the two embark on a journey that drastically alters how they view the world and each other.  Along the way, they discover that the diary isn’t a diary at all, and each question answered only leads to more questions.  Drawn into a tangled web of conspiracy, murder, and science, only a strange gem called the Viniculum seems to hold the answers they seek.

This story was a fun change for me.  I really like YA lit, as a general rule, and Jack Croxall’s tale was no exception.  Our main character, Karl, starts off the book as a loveable rogue, but through the course of the story we begin to see glimpses of the man he will become.  Esther, however, was far and away my favorite character.  From her witty dialogue, to her take-no-guff attitude, she doesn’t just break the mold of the proper Victorian lady, she shatters it.  I loved that the author made her such a strong supporting character, rather than the damsel in distress she could have been.  She’s also such a strong role model for girls in this story, because she definitely kicks butt and takes names, and makes no apologies for who and what she is.  I also loved the strong bond Karl and Esther share, without having that romantic element; they are two friends who love and support each other through thick and thin.

I also really enjoyed the premise of this story; it had a nice mix of supernatural and science to be intriguing without tipping the balance into too much of either.  From the lush and vivid descriptions of their surroundings to the diction used by the characters, you really get a feel for what life was like in that time and place.  The prologue also gives a nice bit of foreshadowing, but keeps things vague enough that when the first chapter starts and we meet Karl and Esther, you keep reading trying to figure out how it’s all connected.  My only (and very minor) complaint was that in the last few chapters, the climax seemed a bit rushed compared with the pacing previously in the story. However, the humongous cliffhanger at the end of the book definitely will have you wanting to know what happens next in the story.  I know I’m definitely looking for book two!

Book Review Tethers by Jack Croxall

About the Book

In the wake of a cold Victorian winter, Karl Scheffer and Esther Emerson discover an anonymous journal filled with strange passages and bizarre scribblings.

The journal soon draws them into a covert and sinister conspiracy, a conspiracy centred around an otherworldly artefact with the power to change everything …

Karl and Esther have spent almost every day of their thirteen years in the quiet market town of Shraye. Stifled by their rural surroundings and frustrated by their unfulfilled ambitions, they find the allure of the journal’s mysterious pages impossible to ignore. The book seems to be beckoning them away from Shraye, away from their homes and towards the coast where an unsolved disappearance has set in motion a dark chain of events.

The voyage the teenagers soon find themselves undertaking is one of desperate importance and true peril; it will change the way they see the world, and each other, forever.

About the Author

Born in High Wycombe, Jack Croxall now lives in rural Nottinghamshire with his chocolate Labrador, Archie. He has a degree in Environmental Science from the University of Nottingham and currently toils away as a science writer in between working on his books. A YA Victorian fantasy, Jack’s debut novel, Tethers follows Karl Scheffer and Esther Emerson as they become embroiled in a treacherous conspiracy. The book is available through Amazon and you can find out more by visiting Jack’s blog or the book’s GoodReads page. You can also follow Jack on Twitter or Facebook.

About the Reviewer

Lisa Lester lives in a humongous house with three cats, three dogs, two dudes (one of which she’s married to, the other one is a refugee from New Jersey) and a partridge in a pear tree…okay, just kidding about the pear tree.  And the partridge too. When she’s not working for the Man. she’s reading or killing stuff on World of Warcraft. She also enjoys nerdy things like Star Wars, crocheting, and pretty much any kind of music.

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On Writing: Music as Inspiration

Music and Prose

Guest post by Jack Croxall

writing inspiration with music

© Creatista | Dreamstime Stock Photos & Stock Free Images

What I’d like to reflect upon here is how useful I’ve found assigning particular songs to certain sequences, settings or even whole chapters of my novel.

I first tried this because I wanted to create a kind of reference point for the feel of some of my scenes; a way of standardising say, a certain location’s mood or the mindset of a particular character. It seemed like a decent enough idea and, once I’d decided on a suitable selection of tracks for a sequence, I always made sure to have a quick listen through any time I wanted to add anything more to said sequence, hopefully preventing myself from accidentally bolting on any tonally dissimilar sentences.

However, I soon realised music could do more for my work than just help with continuity.

I think everybody’s experienced that moment when a familiar song comes on and you’re instantly reminded of how you felt when you first heard it; I know when I hear tracks from Echo Park by Feeder, I suddenly feel as sad as I did at the end of the book I was reading when I bought the album (Watership Down). I mention this because, as I began carefully allocating scene X with track list Y, I started to realise a lot of the older songs in my music library put me in the precise mental state I’d been in when I’d first listened to them during my teenage years.

Now, a lot of teenagers have an incredible amount to deal with and dredging some of that back up could perhaps be considered a bad idea, but upon taking the plunge myself, I recognised I’d discovered a priceless writing tool.

Let me explain a little bit more. The two main characters in my YA novel are, unsurprisingly, teenagers and having not been one for a while, I was sometimes finding it difficult to work out how certain events in the plot might affect them. In rediscovering some of my older music, I realised I’d stumbled upon a valuable window into how I’d felt during the more testing times (but comparatively meagre in the grand scheme) I had gone through as a teenager; insecurity, break ups, cancelation of my favourite TV show etc.

So, the point is, I was suddenly able to construct more realistic reactions and responses to some of the more emotive events that occur throughout my plot, simply because my old music could reminded me of how I’d felt and thought during similar, albeit far less extreme, situations. It really was somewhat of a revelation.

About the Author

Jack Croxall - Author PhotoBorn in High Wycombe, Jack Croxall now lives in rural Nottinghamshire with his chocolate Labrador, Archie. He has a degree in Environmental Science from the University of Nottingham and currently toils away as a science writer in between working on his books. A YA Victorian fantasy, Jack’s debut novel, Tethers follows Karl Scheffer and Esther Emerson as they become embroiled in a treacherous conspiracy. The book is available through Amazon and you can find out more by visiting Jack’s blog or the book’s GoodReads page. You can also follow Jack on Twitter or Facebook.